• NEBOSH & Assessments

    NEBOSH Diploma Syllabus Revision News #12

    This element, as previously unpacks the whole area of checking that the controls you put in place are working adequately.  If you’ve ever read the UK COSHH Regulations you’ll know that it does frame what it means by “adequate control”. Not only in terms of the principles of good practice and the hierarchy of control, but in terms of not exceeding any applicable workplace exposure limit (WEL).  So, element B4 is mostly about WEL. First up in this section again you learn all about the concept of WELs, how they are formulated and where they can be found.  You might initially worry that lead appears to have disappeared, but the…

  • NEBOSH & Assessments

    NEBOSH Diploma Syllabus Revision News #11

    B3 is all about control. Newly in here is a note on “Meaning of prevention and control (COSHH Regulation 7)”. The principles of good practice were always in there but they have been made explicit – each principle being written out in full.  These are followed by a duplication of the hierarchy of control that was already covered in element B2.  This might very well be a mistake.  But as I said last week – this (and discussion of the examples in element B2) would make more sense here anyway.  No control discussion is complete without the special extra duties for especially insidious chemicals (carcinogens etc) where no “safe” level…

  • NEBOSH & Assessments

    NEBOSH Diploma Syllabus Revision News #10

    Element B2 moves on to dealing with hazardous substances in the workplace.  In practice this consolidates much of what used to be in elements B1 with relevant extracts from B2 and B4. The routes of entry and body defences are still there in all their blazing glory.  You’ll notice the previous specific references to the respiratory system defences has been deleted but of course still implied by the catchall “defensive responses”. We now have a much reduced list of specific hazardous substances.  Carbon monoxide is new, isocyanates are making a return.  Nitrogen is new but a slightly odd choice as it isn’t intrinsically a harmful substance (it makes up around…

  • NEBOSH & Assessments

    NEBOSH Diploma Syllabus Revision News #9

    Last week I mentioned that the safety bloke isn’t expected to be a legal expert, but it helps knowing the mind of the regulator.  As it turns out there was a recent example of this cited in the October 2015 edition of the Safety and Health Practitioner (In Court Analysis) – Hague (HSE Inspector) v Rotary Yorkshire Ltd [Court of Appeal, 2015].  This also illustrates the recently topical issue of hindsight bias that can infect everyone. In essence that things can seem very different, predictable or obvious after the event. In this case, the HSE inspector issued a prohibition notice based on the evidence in front of him at the…

  • NEBOSH & Assessments

    NEBOSH Diploma Syllabus Revision News #8

    I promised to finish off the law this time.  As you know this is where the national and internationally diplomas depart from each other. As far as the national qualification goes, much of what is there is simply reinstated from what was previously element A9.  You’ll notice the voyage around the main legislative instruments is there again, as you’d expect.  But this will necessarily repeat some of that is covered in context from element A2 (where there is an in depth treatment of management regulations regarding safety management systems).  The enforcement of health and safety law has been restructured and brought up to date, with some welcome clarifications. There is…

  • NEBOSH & Assessments

    NEBOSH Diploma Syllabus Revision News #7

    In our voyage of unbridled discovery, we continue to element A8.  As with the previous incarnation of the syllabus, this element is basically an extension of the previous element.  The topic of leadership is revisited in the context of human motivation theories. Human motivation theories are like the leadership theories – everyone has their own pet theory and there’s a germ of truth in most of them.  But they never really tell the whole story because of the complexity that is mankind’s psyche. Vroom’s ideas are brought up again. It’s a so-called “expectancy theory” of motivation from the 1960s.  It’s called “expectancy” because people are motivated to behave in a…

  • NEBOSH & Assessments

    NEBOSH Diploma Syllabus Revision News #6

    As our writers continue to busy away at writing, I’ll continue my trawl through Unit A of the national diploma.  Delightfully, we are on to element A7.  This is everyone’s favourite.  The world of “organisational factors” (aka organisational culture, but could also be called “death by misadventure”).  It’s an area that we all know is important – the way we relate to people around us at work and interact with the systems and processes is of equal importance to our technical ability in the job.  This is especially important in safety leadership.  Leadership is subtly different from management and has more of an emphasis on inspiring and motivating people, rather…

  • NEBOSH & Assessments

    NEBOSH Diploma Syllabus Revision News #5

    In element A6, the changes are more subtle.  Once again risk management strategies makes an appearance.  These are the usual risk avoidance, reduction, transfer (a type of risk sharing), and retention.  What has now been added is a section on when you might use these strategies, which was sadly lacking previously – yes, the useful bit.  This links in very much with the risk profile mentioned in the previous element.  The decisions a company makes very much depend on its risk appetite – for example, what level of risk it is prepared to live with before it decides on getting in external solutions. Also introduced are “principles and benefits of…

  • NEBOSH & Assessments

    NEBOSH Diploma Syllabus Revision News #4

    Last week we noted the proposed changes in Unit A, elements 2 & 3.   Much of element is much the same as it was (previously element A3).  There is a greater emphasis on business terminology now, with explicit reference to performance management, key performance indicators and leading/lagging indicators.  Though quite a bit of this has been a feature of such standards as BS 18004 (one of the neat supporting guides to OHSAS 18001) for many years. A new development in A4.3 is something borrowed from the health and well-being qualification – that is how sickness absence data can be used to feed back into occupational health policies (and the targets…